Project Description

Series Overview

A new summer series starts this Sunday! Jesus just switches things up. He tells crowds, “You have heard that it was said, but I say…” Not small things, but colossal things! The world says this, but I say that. The paths diverge and lead to different outcomes. This week, we drill down on how to extinguish the sources of anger in our lives. We are tackling a huge human condition and showing the path forward for all of us. Come on out and let’s get this series started – together.

They Say. I Say. - How Two Can One Become // John Isemann

John, one of the disciples of Jesus, declared that Jesus dwelt among us full of “grace and truth.” It’s a good thing He was full of grace because often times we can’t handle the truth. This Sunday, as we continue our series on conventional wisdom vs. Jesus’ teachings, we come upon a pretty controversial one: marriage. In fact, it’s so controversial that after Jesus spoke on it, He got all “Jack Nicholson-like” and essentially said, “You can’t handle the truth.” The truth about two becoming one – this Summer Sunday at Mendham Hills.

They Say. I Say. - Going To Pieces // David Janssen

Living life seems like a mad dash. Racing the clock, looking over your shoulder, and trying to make time-sensitive turns can leave us gasping for air. We jump into the fray Sunday morning in our talk, unpacking what “they” say and what Jesus says. How do I keep my soul from being shattered in the process of just doing life? They say, but I say – this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

They Say. I Say. - Talk Is Cheap // Tim Berry

…but money talks and actions speak louder than words. So, as good cynics, when someone tells us they’ll do something, we wait to see if they follow through. And, we love to lay the blame for this particular transgression at the feet of lawyers and politicians. But the truth is that the human race as a whole has a tenuous relationship with the truth. Jesus has a new challenge: Say what you mean and mean what you say – this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

They Say. I Say. - What Are You Looking At? // John Isemann

I had a friend last week who, while in Guatemala, went to visit a ministry that serves children who are born both blind and deaf. All of us can certainly understand the desperate nature of their conditions. Yet, my friend told me his understanding paled in comparison to their reality – a reality that became his for a morning as they blindfolded him and placed earplugs in his ears. That reality changed his perspective. His eyes became dark and he could not see. Jesus warns us of such a condition, one He insisted was common: eyes that do not see. This Sunday, all of our teams are home from Guatemala but the question each of us must answer is…what are you looking at?

They Say. I Say. - A Reward Has Been Posted // John Isemann

Rewards are powerful things. Lose your wedding ring…I feel bad. Lose your wedding ring and post a reward…I start looking! Our ability to overcome even the most difficult of circumstances is often directly related to our perception of the reward to come. Rewards matter. The Scriptures teach that the “ancients” understood this and it fueled faith and transformation. Have we “moderns” forgotten that a reward has been posted?

They Say. I Say. - Living In the Land of Mirages // David Janssen

In a world that is sometimes upside down, people say rewards are based on impressing people that you can see in real-time and in real space. In our summer series, Jesus goes the other way: focusing on the reality of the unseen. Lots of things are unseen, but we know they exist. Air. Internet. Wind. Gravity. In the land of mirages, what isn’t seen turns out to be real; what seems to be real can be a mirage. Open your eyes…this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

They Say. I Say. - The Kingdom of the Upside-Down // Tim Berry

Few words in the Bible have provoked as much anger and debate as these: an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. The Lex Talionis. The Law of Retribution. Atheists claim it proves the Bible contains internal contradictions. Gandhi said it would leave the whole world blind. For the Pharisees, it was a loophole allowing them to serve up cold-hearted revenge. Jesus acknowledges that many have weighed in on these much-debated words. And once again, as his sermon crescendos, he repeats, “but I say to you,” this Sunday at Mendham Hills.