SERIES OVERVIEW

“…to love somebody.” Great song, but an even deeper truth. Jesus said as much when he said, “A new command I give you: Love one another as I have loved you.” Why is it that we spend so much time and effort on every other command, and so little on what would become known as the “great one?” Who taught you how to love? If you think it’s just natural, think again. This weekend we launch our new series, “Love Does.” You and I really don’t know how to love somebody, and it’s time we learn. A series that could transform and save every relationship you have begins this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

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Sermon Description

“…to love somebody.” Great song, but an even deeper truth. Jesus said as much when he said, “A new command I give you: Love one another as I have loved you.” Why is it that we spend so much time and effort on every other command, and so little on what would become known as the “great one?” Who taught you how to love? If you think it’s just natural, think again. This weekend we launch our new series, “Love Does.” You and I really don’t know how to love somebody, and it’s time we learn. A series that could transform and save every relationship you have begins this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

Sermon Description

George Thorogood sang it, Jesus answered it. If love is a verb, if love is a command, then who do we love? Maybe you or a skeptical friend have had trouble rationalizing a God of love with a world full of hate. How am I supposed to love my enemies when I have trouble loving my spouse? Learning to love everybody, always – this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

Sermon Description

Jesus summed up all the Old Testament Laws and Prophets with two new commands: Love God and love others. One of His early followers, the Apostle Paul, went even further when he wrote, “The only thing that counts is faith expressing itself through love.” For them, the command to love had nothing to do with a feeling. Jesus commanded an action, and then Jesus showed us how to love. This Sunday at Mendham Hills, we look at the dirty little word behind real love. Warning: You might not like it, but if you really want to know what love is, Jesus will show you.

Sermon Description

I’m kind of an old school guy. Sure, I pay my bills online now, but I refuse to check the box asking me to “go paperless.” I still want the bill to come in the mail. I want to hold it in my hand, review it, and then file it away. This way, at a moment’s notice, I can simply go to my filing cabinet and be reminded of who I paid for what and when. My memory might fade, but my filing cabinet is there forever. Oh, yeah…I also want to do that with things that people have done or said that hurt, disappointed or angered me. I have filed them away and I can bring them back at a moment’s notice. How about you? We have a singular command – to love. This is NOT what love does. Destroying the record of wrongs, this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

Sermon Description

Always, not sometimes. Always, not once-in-a-while. Always, not occasionally. Always, not some day. Seems kind of repetitive, right? That’s the point. For most of us, love is kind of like a dance – there’s a back and forth to it. You give, I give. You take, I take. That is not the kind of love that is the singular command of Jesus. Nor is it the kind of love He has for you. What does love always, always, always, always do? Find out this Sunday at Mendham Hills.

Sermon Description

“When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things.” So said the apostle Paul. He grew up, he matured…but in regards to what? He was not speaking generally, but specifically. He grew up. He changed the way he spoke, understood, and thought about love. Most of us never do, though. When it comes to love, we still think and speak like children and wonder why our Barbie Dream House images wind up more like an Adam’s Family haunted house. This week, we conclude our “Love Does” series, and here’s a hint – Love Wins!